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Adolescent dating violence victimization and psychological well being

The present investigation expands upon prior studies by examining the relationship between health in late adolescence and the experience of physical/sexual and non-physical dating violence victimization, including dating violence types that are relevant to today’s adolescents (e.g., harassment via email and text messaging).We examined the relationship between physical/sexual and non-physical dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 and health in late adolescence/early adulthood.

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Retrieved from 8 pages) Decker, M., Silverman, J., & Raj, A. Dating violence and sexually transmitted disease/HIV testing and diagnosis among adolescent females. This work would not have been possible without the permission and assistance of the schools and school districts.METHODS: Secondary analysis of Waves 1 (1994–1995), 2 (1996), and 3 (2001–2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative sample of US high schools and middle schools.Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

Compared to non-exposed females, females with were at increased risk of smoking (PR = 3.61), depressive symptoms (down/hopeless, PR = 1.41; lost interest, PR = 1.36), eating disorders (fasting, PR = 3.37; vomiting, PR = 2.66), having 5 intercourse partners (PR = 2.20), and having anal sex (PR = 2.18).

For males, no health differences were observed for those experiencing For females, more pronounced adverse health was observed for those exposed to physical/sexual versus non-physical dating violence.

For both females and males, non-physical dating violence victimization contributed to poor health. A recent longitudinal study by Exner-Cortens and colleagues (2013) examined health in late adolescence/young adulthood by dating violence types (psychological violence only and physical and psychological violence together) experienced from age 12 to 18 [].

Subjects who experienced both physical and psychological violence were at risk for poor health outcomes; exposed females had increased risk of depression symptoms, suicidal ideation, smoking, and adult violence victimization, and exposed males had increased risk of adult violence victimization.

In addition to exploring this complex relationship, the present study examines whether psychological abuse perpetration mediates the relationship between acceptance of dating violence and mental health (i.e., internalizing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hostility).